E-flections of an Educator

Blogs as Mentor Text

Posted on: April 27, 2009

I just spent a little time reading/editing a few blog posts, and realized a couple of blogs I read serve as mentor texts for me as a blogger. The cool thing is that they are not the blogs of educators! (Read what Brenda Power from Choice Literacy has to say about Mentor Texts.)

Robert Hruzek

Robert Hruzek

I stumbled upon Middle Zone Musings by Robert Hruzek through a couple of non-educator tweets I follow, Rosa Say and Joanna Young. I love Robert’s style, which is a perfect balance of engaging, entertaining, and thought-provoking. I don’t think I’ve ever read someone who has such a mastery of the aside, and I realized I “borrowed” his technique in my Lessons from a Dog post when I wrote “(Do yourself a favor and take a moment to read it.)” I almost added “I’ll wait” which is what Robert does, but then I thought that might be “copying” too much. But really, what was I thinking? When we work with student writers, don’t we encourage them to “try out” styles and techniques from authors? Why can’t the same be true for blogging? Of course it can be!

George Angus

George Angus

George Angus is another blogger whose writing I really admire and enjoy. His blog is Tumblemoose Writing Services: Inspiring Writers Every Day. Like Robert, George is very engaging as a writer. I really like the back-and-forth dialogue he has with readers in the comments of his posts. My “Georgism” (NOT to be confused with “Bushism“) is reflected in On Being a Producer of Content. George often uses “cheers” as a closing in his comments. I like the feeling of connection in the word (I dare you to say the word cheers and not think of raising a glass!) so I used it in my closing for the post, because, after all, isn’t blogging about connecting?

George and Robert are also engaging on Twitter, though with Robert in Texas and George in Alaska, I don’t often “live tweet” with them (I’m in Michigan). But that’s one of the great things about twitter–asynchronous dialogue. So if you are on Twitter (and if you are not, you should be!) give @roberthruzek and @tumblemoose a follow-you’ll be glad you did!

So with a “tip-o-the-topper” (nod to Robert!) thank you, Robert and George, for your inspiration.

Who inspires your writing?

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6 Responses to "Blogs as Mentor Text"

Thank you so much for the shout out.

I am deeply inspired and humbled when I get mentions such as this.

Linda, it’s great folks like yourself that are active, engaging and thoughtful that really make this blogging world go ’round.

What else can I say but…Cheers!

George

What a great post that pays homage to two writers who both inspire and entertain. Robert offers some brilliant insight and a conversational tone. George also has a great conversational tone and speaks with a blunt honesty that I find refreshing.

These two certainly inspire me when blogging, but along with them I would have to say Joanna Young is another brilliant inspiration.It was reading her Confident Writing blog that actually inspired me, and gave me the confidence, to start my own writing blog.

Thanks for the post.

Matt

[…] This post was Twitted by tumblemoose […]

Aw, shucks, Linda! Wow, to be mentioned in the same context with my buddy George (and George, you’ll notice she listed me first!) is just finer than a frog’s hair, to say the least!

Hey, a tip o’ the hat to ya!

Robert,

Something about age before…

Hehe.

Matt, thanks for the kind words, mate.

You are an awesome friend

George

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